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breastfeeding baby

  1. Latching Baby At The Breast

    Latching Baby At The  Breast

    Breastfeeding will be more relaxed and comfortable for you and your baby if you get a good latch right from the start. A good latch can head off breastfeeding problems before they happen: it will enable your baby to get more milk and to drain your breasts effectively and this will signal your breasts to make more milk, increasing your supply. And, although you can expect a wee bit of discomfort as you begin breastfeeding, rather like trying out a new pair of shoes, having a good latch at the breast will avoid damaged nipples and painful feeds.

    Signs of an effective latch include feeling comfortable, without pain, ‘pinching’ or a ‘biting’ sensation; your baby’s mouth will cover some or all of your areola, depending on the size of your areola (the dark part surrounding your nipple), with most or all of the underside and some of the top of the areola in your baby’s mouth; your baby’s lips will be flanged outwards, like ‘fish lips’ and baby’s tongue will be cupped under you

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  2. Breastfeeding and Sex: 5 Things You Might Not Know

    Breastfeeding and Sex: 5 Things You Might Not Know

    There’s nothing quite like four hours of broken sleep and cracked nipples to get you “in the mood”, right?

    Mama, it’s completely normal for your sex drive to take a nosedive after you’ve had a baby.

    Spending your days (and nights) snuggling, comforting and breastfeeding your new baby can leave you feeling completely touched out – not to mention the significant biological and hormonal changes going on inside your body right now.

    Here are 5 interesting facts about breastfeeding and sex that you might now know:

    1:Breastfeeding hormones can affect your sex drive

    Apart from feeling dead tired and touched out, there are also some biological reasons why your libido has go

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  3. Top Tips For Breastfeeding Your Newborn When You Have a Toddler Too

    Top Tips For Breastfeeding Your Newborn When You Have a Toddler Too
    Managing feeding times when you have a toddler as well as a newborn can be especially difficult because it takes so much time in the early days. Try these tips to support your toddler and make feeding your newborn easier:
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  4. 19 virtual activities for kids of all ages

    19 virtual activities for kids of all ages

    The kids have explored every inch of the backyard and even the local park is off-limits. This is lockdown life with kids – it’s hard and it’s exhausting. If you’re struggling for new ideas to keep your little ones entertained during lockdown, especially if you are also feeding and caring for a baby, we’ve got you!

    We’ve pulled together a list of fun resources for kids of all ages.

    There’s something for everyone: from exploring the world’s museums, to story time from space – all without leaving your home.

    For the animal lovers

    Animals At Home Explore Melbourne’s three zoos, listen to keeper talks and see what the giraffes are up to on Werribee Zoo’s savannah.

    Atlanta Zoo Panda Cam Watch Atlanta Zoo’s pandas chew bamboo and tumble about. So cute!

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  5. 11 Amazing facts about breastmilk that you may not know

    11 Amazing facts about breastmilk that you may not know
    Your breast milk is LIVE! Just like human blood, breast milk is a living fluid containing a range of germ killing substances, healthy bacteria, antibodies, white blood cells, antimicrobials and cell wall protectors and proteins that offer protection against bacteria and viruses.
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  6. Food and Mothers' Milk - How your diet can boost your breast milk

    Food and Mothers' Milk - How your diet can boost your breast milk
    For decades we have known that the foods we eat do pass into mothers’ milk and we have research to show that various elements impact babies’ health and development.When mothers understand the impact of their own diets on their breastfeeding experience, more women who choose to will be able to breastfeed with greater confidence.
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  7. Breastfeeding When Baby is Unwell

    Breastfeeding When Baby is Unwell
    Fortunately, due to the immunity boosting factors in your breast-milk, your breastfed baby will usually be healthy and well. However, if your baby does get sick, for instance with a cold or ear infection, this may affect his feeding.
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  8. When Baby Won't Breastfeed - Breast Refusal, Nursing Strike or Weaning?

    When Baby Won't Breastfeed - Breast Refusal, Nursing Strike or Weaning?

    Here you are, dripping milk, all ready for your baby to feed – but he won’t!

    If you have a newborn, there is every chance you will be ‘woman handled’ as somebody tries to get your baby to latch by grabbing baby and boob and shoving them together (if this happens, put your hand up in a stop sign and ask, ‘please can you guide me, I would like to try myself’).

    Or, if your baby is older and has been happily breastfeeding until now, you are probably wondering, ‘is he weaning?’

    Whatever the reasons for your baby’s breast refusal, your baby isn’t ‘refusing’ to breastfeed because he is being stubborn, and forcing him won’t help.

    For newborns, generally if your baby won’t breastfeed it is because he can’t right now, but it doesn’t mean you won’t be able to breastfeed at all – although you will need to be patient, with the right help, most

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  9. Exhausted? Overwhelmed? Foggy Brain? Is It Postnatal Depletion?

    Exhausted? Overwhelmed? Foggy Brain? Is It Postnatal Depletion?

    “I know I need to exercise but I don’t even have the energy to go for a walk, I feel so tired all the time and I am anxious without any reason,” says Sarah, mum of a happy thriving eight month old. When I visited her, Sarah asked her husband to take notes because her brain was so foggy she could barely stay on track in conversation, let alone remember what we discussed.

    According to Dr Oscar Serrallach, Sarah’s symptoms are typical of a condition he has labeled ‘Postnatal Depletion’. Formerly an emergency medicine doctor, Dr, Serrallach is now a GP in Northern NSW specializing in nutritional and integrative medicine and author of ‘The Postnatal Depletion Cure’. He says, “ a lot of my clients were new mums, they seemed to be really tired and not coping well and initially I thought this was quite normal. But, just because something is common doesn’t ne

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  10. 75 Reasons Your Baby Needs to Breastfeed

    75 Reasons Your Baby Needs to Breastfeed
    We asked mothers for all the reasons their babies wanted boobies and here, we have 75 very good reasons babies may need to snuggle in and refuel on magic mama milk– besides feeling hungry!
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  11. Breastfeeding - 5 Things You Don't Need to Worry About - even though everyone says you should

    Breastfeeding - 5 Things You Don't Need to Worry About - even though everyone says you should
    There are so many rules about being a good mum and if you are breastfeeding there are even more ‘rules’.Because these rules are about feeding your baby and actually making him grow and stay alive, is it any wonder you feel anxious? Take heart, you can ditch these 5 'rules' and stop worrying.
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  12. Six Myths About Breastfeeding Toddlers - Let's Bust These Now!

    Six Myths About Breastfeeding Toddlers - Let's Bust These Now!

    As he pulled on his little ‘working boots’ my three year old gazed up and told me very matter of factly, “Mummy, when I get scared, booby makes me feel brave.”

    When I breastfed our first two babies, I wasn’t aware of the nutritional or immunological benefits of breastfeeding older babies or toddlers (no, there is no ‘best before’ stamp on mama milk!); I simply kept on breastfeeding them because it felt right. In fact with each of our five children, breastfeeding has been an integral part of my relationship with them and not just about ‘food’.

    As newborns, breastfeeding gave my babies a gentle beginning, and as toddlers, it soothed life’s little knocks, easing the discomfort of swollen teething gums and picking them up when they fell (or fell apart emotionally). Breastfeeding provi

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  13. Four Reasons Your Newborn Shouldn’t Sleep ‘All Night’ (Just yet).

    Four Reasons Your Newborn Shouldn’t Sleep ‘All Night’ (Just yet).

    You have finally made it beyond the letter-box with your newborn. You are feeling pretty proud of yourself for getting out and about between feeds, poos and spews and you even have your own shirt on the right way round. But then some dear old lady spies your little ‘freshie’ and as she peers into your pram, she can’t resist asking, ‘is he a good baby?’

    Then that dreaded next question, ‘does he sleep all night?’

    Suddenly you are hit by a wave of self-doubt. You wonder, ‘should my baby be sleeping longer? This isn’t helped by all the baby sleep programs advertising how to teach your baby to sleep ‘all night’. Especially when you read that babies can sleep 8 hours or 12 hours or whatever is being promised. Or that you can expect your baby to give you a full night’s sleep when he is just a few weeks old – if you just follow the right ‘method’.

    Firstly, ‘all night’

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  14. Managing Your Day With a Newborn -Your New Mum Survival Checklist

    Managing Your Day With a Newborn -Your New Mum Survival Checklist
    From new mothers, I often hear comments like: “I can’t even have a shower because I don’t know how long she will sleep for.” Or: “It takes so long to get him to sleep that we start cooking dinner at 9 p.m.” If your baby hasn’t yet been born, these sorts of things may sound ridiculous. However, managing your day around a newborn can be a challenge, especially if you’re used to order and punctuality. See Pinky's new mum survival checklist:
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  15. Big Boobs,Small Boobs and Breast Milk Supply - Does Size Matter?

    Big Boobs,Small Boobs and Breast Milk Supply  - Does Size Matter?
    Generally, breast size doesn’t matter. However, there are some medical conditions that can impact milk supply regardless of breast size and for a small number of women, size and shape can be an indicator that there could be challenges to milk supply
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  16. Busting out all over - preventing and treating breast engorgement.

    Busting out all over - preventing and treating breast engorgement.
    Sometime between the second and sixth day after your baby’s birth, your milk will ‘come in’.For some women this is a gradual process with relatively little discomfort, but for many it can feel very sudden and surprisingly painful – you can feel as though your breasts are literally bursting! Your breasts may feel hot and hard and you may feel throbbing, with this swelling and hardness even extending up to your armpits. Read more to see how you can prevent or relieve engorgement.
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  17. When It's Your Baby, Not You Screwing things up

    When It's Your Baby, Not You Screwing things up

    Unrealistic expectations, pressure to be the perfect mum and too many ‘rules’ are making mums overthink – and blame themselves when they don’t have a ‘good’ baby. The first question every new mum is asked will be ‘is he a good baby?’ This will be followed by, ‘how does he sleep?’ Is it any wonder mums are asking, ‘am I screwing things up?’

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  18. Crying Cures - 16 Ways to Calm your Crying Baby

    Crying Cures - 16 Ways to Calm your Crying Baby
    Crying is your baby’s language. At first, it is pretty much the only way an infant can communicate his needs and express feelings like discomfort, hunger, exhaustion and loneliness. It is also the only way he can release pent up stress. As your baby grows he will learn other ways to communicate—through facial expressions, body language and, eventually, by telling you how he feels and what he needs. For now, though, here are some tips to help you soothe the sobs:
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  19. From Breastfeeding to Family Foods - when baby needs more than milk

    From Breastfeeding to Family Foods - when baby needs more than milk

    Around the middle of your baby’s first year, that is at about six months, your baby will start showing signs that he is ready for family foods: he will be able to sit up in a high chair or on your lap; he will have lost the tongue thrust reflex (that protects him against choking in the early months, but also means food gets thrust out of his mouth, rather than swallowed); he will be watching you closely as you eat and probably reaching for your food  - but being able to grab objects and put them into his mouth is an actual sign of readiness ( after all, even young babies will watch you and may reach for food).  Your baby may seem to suddenly be more hungry but not satisfied by extra milk feeds over a period of several days.

    See how, when and what to help your baby transition from breastfeeding to family foods

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  20. When Baby Bites the Boob - how to prevent biting

    When Baby Bites the Boob - how to prevent biting

    Help! My baby has his first two teeth and he has started biting when I breastfeed. How can I stop him biting or will I have to wean him?

    Ouch! Being bitten on the breast really hurts but thankfully, there are strategies to minimise and even stop your baby biting.

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